Students across the country have big plans: 94% have aspirations of attending college and 70% have career goals that require a college degree.

However, though the majority of students see college in their future, research shows that what happens early on in their education can determine whether college remains a possibility. When students are not on grade level in reading by third grade, they are four times as likely to drop out of high school. Students are also more likely to drop out of high school when they fail English or math in middle school.

The best way to prepare students for college is to start early. And yet, in California, only 3 in 10 African American and Latino third graders are on grade level in English. Only 3 in 10 African American and 4 in 10 Latino eighth graders are on grade level in English.

The results for Latinos are even worse in Ravenswood City School District. Latino students make up over 80 percent of the student population in the district, but only 2 in 10 Latino third graders are on grade level in English. Only 3 in 10 Latino eighth graders are on grade level in English.

After students graduate Ravenswood City School District  and attend Sequoia Union High School District, the results do not improve. Although graduation rates at Sequoia Union are high, only 4 in 10 Latinos graduate eligible to attend a California public university.

Regardless of whether students choose college or not, every child across the state should get an education that guarantees them the option of higher education. But in Ravenswood City School District, most Latino students are not on track to be ready for college.

Read our latest series to learn how to hold schools accountable for ensuring your child graduates high school ready for college.